Effects of electrolyzed hydrogen water ingestion during endurance exercise in a heated environment on body fluid balance and exercise performance


Hiroto Ito 1Shigeru Kabayma 2Kazushige Goto 1Affiliations expand

Electrolyzed hydrogen water (EHW) is generated at a cathode. It contains many hydrogen molecules with high alkaline properties. The physiological effects of ingesting EHW during endurance exercise are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of ingesting EHW during endurance exercise in a heated environment on body fluid balance and exercise performance. Twelve triathletes (20.0 ± 1.3 years, 171 ± 6 cm, 60.6 ± 3.9 kg, V̇O2max 67.1 ± 3.8 mL/kg/min) performed pedaling exercise for 60 min at 65% of V̇O2max consuming either purified water (CON trial) or EHW (EHW trial) and then conducted an incremental pedaling test. Blood parameters, tissue temperature, and respiratory variables were determined during 60 min of exercise. The time to exhaustion (TTE) during the incremental pedaling test was also determined. Body weights were 1.1 ± 0.4 kg lower after exercise, with no significant differences between trials. Plasma volume and serum osmolality and blood sodium and potassium concentrations significantly changed with exercise, but no significant differences were observed between trials. The pH, blood lactate and bicarbonate concentrations, and changes in skin and muscle temperature did not significantly differ between the two trials. Energy expenditure during exercise was significantly (P = 0.04) lower in the EHW trial (13.2 ± 0.5 kcal/min) than in the CON trial (13.7 ± 0.4 kcal/min). TTE did not significantly differ between the trials. In conclusion, EHW ingestion during endurance exercise in a heated environment decreased energy expenditure but did not affect body fluid balance or exercise performance. Abbreviations: CON: control trial; CV: coefficient of variation; EHW: electrolyzed hydrogen water; HR: heart rate; RPE: rating of perceived exertion; SE: standard error; TP: total protein; TTE: time to exhaustion.

PubMed

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